Esquire names Scarlett Johansson ‘sexiest’ alive

Esquire names Scarlett Johansson ‘sexiest’ alive

SCARLETT IS SEXIEST: Scarlett Johansson is named Esquire's sexiest woman alive. Photo: Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Seven years after being named Esquire magazine’s sexiest woman alive, Scarlett Johansson has earned the title for a second time.

Johansson, who also won in 2006, is the first woman to get the honor twice. Last year’s winner was Mila Kunis.

Johansson jokingly tells the magazine she’s “gotta hustle” and “pretty soon the roles you’re offered all become mothers. Then they just sort of stop.”

The 28-year-old actress is also off the market. She recently went public with her engagement to former French journalist Romain Dauriac. It will be her second marriage. She split from Ryan Reynolds in 2010.

She says jealousy “comes with the territory” with a Frenchman but she prefers being with someone “who’s a little jealous.”

The November issue of Esquire will be on newsstands Oct. 15.

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