News

It’s official: World Trade Center is tallest U.S. building

It’s official: World Trade Center is tallest U.S. building

STANDING TALL: Four World Trade Center, center, reflects its neighbor, One World Trade Center, left, Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013 in New York. The 1,776-foot One World Trade Center is the marquee skyscraper at ground zero; but the first office tower to open there will be its shorter neighbor 4 World Trade Center on Wednesday, Nov. 13. Photo: Associated Press/Mark Lennihan

DON BABWIN, Associated Press

CHICAGO (AP) — An expert committee of architects declares that New York’s new World Trade Center tower is now the tallest building in the U.S., surpassing Chicago’s Willis Tower.

The Height Committee of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat announced its decision Tuesday in Chicago.

The committee is widely recognized as the final arbiter of official building heights around the world.

It has been studying whether a design change means the needle atop 1 World Trade Center is part of the actual building or merely the equivalent of a broadcast antenna.

The tower built on the site of the 9/11 attacks stands at a symbolically important 1,776 feet tall including the 408-foot needle. It officially would have been considered 1,368 feet tall without the needle.

Willis Tower is 1,451 feet tall.

Recent Headlines

in Music

HBO documentary, concert special to focus on U2

16-overlay8

The Irish rockers are set to take fans behind the scenes of their current iNNOCENCE + eXPERIENCE world tour.

in Music

Watch 1,000 people play ‘Learn to Fly’

23-overlay20

This is the most amazing Foo Fighters tribute band ever.

in Entertainment

NETFLIX: Watch it before it’s gone

netflix

These titles are expiring soon - so start binge watching now!

in Music

Shakira’s son, the future soccer star?

22-overlay16

The "Hips Don't Lie" hitmaker posts a video of little Sasha following in his father's athletic footsteps.

in Viral Videos

Watch this reporter confront the woman accused of stealing his identity

14-overlay19

An accused credit card thief picked the wrong guy when she used a credit card number belonging to Texas consumer affairs reporter Steve Noviello.