College scholarships for playing video games?

College scholarships for playing video games?

VIDEO GAMES: Big money for gamer skills? It could become a reality for college scholarships. Photo: Associated Press

CHICAGO (AP) — Hey kid! Put down that ball, come in here and play some video games! OK, it’s unlikely you’ll hear parents urge their youngsters to do that this summer.

But some might think about it — now that a small private university is offering big scholarship money for those who are good at the game “League of Legends.” Robert Morris University Illinois says it picked the game because it has become one of the most popular for setting up organized team competition.

The school says it’s setting up the scholarship program to recognize the growing legitimacy of are being known as “eSports.”

The school says it also wants to give credit to those with a competitive spirit who don’t necessarily want to play traditional sports such as basketball or football.

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