Jazz hire Hawks assistant Snyder as new head coach

Jazz hire Hawks assistant Snyder as new head coach

NBA Logo Photo: Associated Press/Associated Press

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Utah Jazz announced Friday that they have hired Atlanta Hawks assistant coach Quin Snyder to replace Tyrone Corbin, who was let go earlier this year after three-plus seasons in Salt Lake City.

Snyder most recently completed his first season as an assistant with Atlanta. He has also been an assistant with the Los Angeles Lakers, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Clippers. He was the head coach at Missouri for seven season, from 1999 to 2006, leading the Tigers to four NCAA tournaments. That included an Elite Eight appearance in 2002.

Jazz CEO Greg Miller said in a release that Snyder has an “impressive basketball pedigree.”
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